Natural History

Week 2: The Song of Nature, theme 1: ORGANISMS
Week 3: The Song of Nature, theme 1: ORGANISMS
Week 4: The Song of Nature, theme 1: ORGANISMS
Week 6: The Song of Nature, theme 2: STORIES
Week 7: The Song of Nature, theme 2: STORIES
Week 8: The Song of Nature, theme 2: STORIES
Week 9: Interlude - To Experience Nature
Week 10: The Song of Nature, theme 3: ENVIRONMENT
Week 11: The Song of Nature, theme 3: ENVIRONMENTS
Week 12: The Song of Nature, theme 3: ENVIRONMENTS
Appendix #1 - Natural History Books
Appendix #2 - Index of Nature Poems
Appendix #3 - Selected Outlines of Living Things

Day 2: Lotic

Words

Stream ecology is an interdisciplinary area of science that brings together biology (especially ecology), and the physical (earth) sciences such as hydrology.

Video: “Study In Stream Ecology (USGS)” (6:56)

Here is a 4-part mini course from the American Museum of Natural History and the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, focusing on river ecology, and in particular the problem of the invasive zebra mussel in the Hudson River. Alternate the readings and the short videos as you move through this minicourse.

Reading: “River Ecology 1 – An Unwelcome Newcomer” (3pp) 

Video: “River Ecology 1 – The Problem” (2:10)

Reading: “River Ecology 2 – Zebra Mussels and the Hudson River” (4pp) 

Video: “River Ecology 2 – Observation” (3:37)

Reading: “River Ecology 3 – The Short-Term Impact of the Zebra Mussel Invasion” (3pp) Video: “River Ecology 3 – Results” (4:23)

Reading: “River Ecology 4 – Long-Term Monitoring of the Hudson River” (3pp) 

Video: “River Ecology 4 – Going Further” (3:03)

Works

As with Day 1, focus your observations on a stream of any size today or on any other observation day, if that is possible near where you live or where you can travel. These flowing fingers of water are called “streams” in general, although that word is also used for smaller ones. Feel free to visit anything from a tiny creek that might only flow at some times of year, to a huge river that carries enormous amounts of water across large stretches of a continent. Be careful when you conduct your observations—rivers can be dangerous! Safely enjoy the stream, its movements, the shape of the shoreline and its associated life, and any other aspects of the stream and its interaction with the surrounding areas.